Violin Sonata No.2 (Sydeman, William Jay)

Contents

Performances

Recordings

No files submitted.

Synthesized/MIDI

MP3 file (audio)
Rickshinozaki (2017/8/29)

MP3 file (audio)
Rickshinozaki (2017/8/29)

MP3 file (audio)
Rickshinozaki (2017/8/29)

Performers Realization by the composer
Publisher Info. William Jay Sydeman
Copyright
Purchase
Javascript is required for this feature.

Sheet Music

Scores and Parts

PDF typeset by composer
Rickshinozaki (2017/8/29)

PDF typeset by composer
Rickshinozaki (2017/8/29)

Publisher. Info. Arts Aeturnum Productions, 2012.
Copyright
Purchase
Javascript is required for this feature.

Javascript is required to submit files.

General Information

Work Title Sonata No.2
Alternative. Title
Composer Sydeman, William Jay
Movements/SectionsMov'ts/Sec's 3 movements:
1. Andante
2. Rubato espressivo
3. Allegro
Year/Date of CompositionY/D of Comp. 1984
Average DurationAvg. Duration 9 minutes
Composer Time PeriodComp. Period Modern
Piece Style Modern
Instrumentation violin, piano

Misc. Comments

The 1984 Sonata hearkens back somewhat to Hindemith in the first movement. It is lyrical in a vigorous sort of way, or perhaps vigorous in a lyrical sort of way. Take your pick! The second movement is intense and introspective ... one of the loveliest works (I believe) I have written, while the third has a Stravinsky-an sort of high energy, rhythmic feel, and even pan-diatonic tonal language.

I cannot recall whom I wrote this work for (over 25 years ago), but judging from the more familiar style that it is written in and also from the fact that I had become a minor violist (attending chamber music workshops and such), I have to assume it might have been written for a dedicated amateur. I am somewhat proud to have written a series of works that are not hugely demanding technically and could add to the repertoire of enthusiastic string players. This actually was quite a large focus of my composing during the ‘eighties, and I have come to understood that technical demands do not necessarily create a more profound musical experience... often quite the opposite. So this body of work may ultimately fill an important niche in the repertoire. I hope so.

– W. Jay Sydeman